Fri Apr 29 09:52:20 SGT 2016  
SINGAPORE
VACCINE™
    Vaccine, Singapore (SG)

Vaccine, Singapore (SG)

Summary

Vaccine, Singapore (SG) @singaporevaccine_com: vaccine jab/shot/injection schedule, to vaccinate against the infection, to immunise against infectious disease, Singapore. Private and confidential service. Definitions, references, and latest news.

Description

Vaccine types available for vaccination / immunisation (uk) / immunization (us) :

Vaccine Against Disease Age D
o
s
e
s
Dose schedule Price
per
dose
(SG$)
Live attenuated
MMR vaccine ≥12m 1 $70/=
Measles virus Measles
Mumps virus Mumps
Rubella virus Rubella
Varilrix™ Varicella zoster virus
HHV-3
Varicella Chickenpox 12m-12y 1 $121/=
≥13y 2 6-10w interval
Zostavax™ Herpes zoster Shingles ≥50y 1 $295/=
Stamaril® Yellow fever virus Yellow fever 9m-59y 1 10 yearly $250/=
Inactivated / Whole / Viral & Bacterial
Rabipur® Rabies virus Rabies any 3 d 0, 7, & 21 or 28 $call/=
Ixiaro® Japanese encephalitis virus Japanese encephalitis ≥17y 2 2nd: 28d after 1st $386/=
1 Booster: 12-24m after 2nd
Dukoral® Vibrio cholerae Cholera 2-6y 3 1-6w interval $113/=
1 Booster: 6m after 3rd
≥6y 2 1-6w interval
1 Booster: 2y after 2nd
Inactivated / Fractional / Protein
Intanza™ Influenza virus Influenza 18-59y 1 1 yearly $30/=
Fluarix™ Influenza virus Influenza 6-36m ½ 1 yearly $30/=
>3y 1
Tetavax Clostridium tetani Tetanus adults 3 1-2m interval
3rd @ 6-12m
after 2nd
$30/=
booster 1 10 yearly
Boostrix® ≥4y 1 <10 yearly $70/=
Corynebacterium diphtheriae Diphtheria
Clostridium tetani Tetanus
Bordetella pertussis Pertussis
Whooping cough
Inactivated / Fractional / Polysaccharide / Pure
Typhim Vi® Salmonella typhi Typhoid fever >5y 1 3 yearly $48/=
Mencevax® ACWY Neisseria meningitidis
types A, C, W-135
and Y
Meningococcal meningitis >2y 1 $80/=
Inactivated / Fractional / Polysaccharide / Conjugate
Menactra® Neisseria meningitidis
types A, C, W-135
and Y
Meningococcal meningitis 2-55y 1 $195/=
Prevenar 13® (SG) /
Prevnar 13® (US)
Streptococcus pneumoniae
types 1, 3, 4, 5,
6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14,
18C, 19A, 19F, 23F
Pneumococcal infection 6w-6m 4 1m interval
4th @ 12-15m
$274/=
7-11m 2 1m interval
12-23m 2 2m interval
2-5y 1
≥50y 1

If the clinic attendance is just for vaccination alone, no additional consultation fees are charged.

Testing for immunity against the following is available:

Virus Antibody Test Price
Varicella zoster virus Varicella Zoster IgG Antibody $44/=
Measles virus Measles IgG Antibody $90/=
Rubella virus Rubella IgG Antibody $24/=
Hepatitis A virus Hepatitis A IgG Antibody $30/=
Hepatitis B virus Hepatitis B surface Antibody $10/=

Other vaccines not stocked

References

Advertisement: Come to sunny Singapore to have your testing and treatment. Singapore Ministry of Health registered general practice (GP) clinic:
SHIM CLINIC
168 Bedok South Avenue 3 #01-473
Singapore 460168
Tel: (+65) 6446 7446
Fax: (+65) 6449 7446
24hr Answering Tel: (+65) 6333 5550
Web: www.shimclinic.com
Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9 am to 3 pm, 7 pm to 11 pm
Saturday & Sunday: 7 pm to 11 pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Last registration: one hour before closing time.
Walk-in clinic. Appointments not required.
Bring NRIC, Work Pass or Passport for registration.

References


Latest News

Mozambique's perspective on antibiotic resistance
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:41 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: For the last two decades, health has been a high priority in Mozambique. Although antibiotic resistance was not a major focus, many of the measures taken, by the Mozambique government, will have helped preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics. These include reducing the burden of infectious disease by introducing new vaccines in the national immunization program, building health infrastructure in rural settings, increasing the paramedical and medical workforce at the district level, deploying community health workers in remote underserved settings, adopting Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in basic health facilities and encouraging the establishment of private pharmacies in the rural areas where most of the population lives. (Source: International Journal of Inf...

Roadmap for dengue vaccination introduction in Mexico
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:41 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: (no abstract received from presenter) (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Dengue vaccination impact: Perspective from modeling
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:41 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: (no abstract received from presenter) (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Recent update on dengue vaccine development
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:41 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: (no abstract received from presenter) (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Prevention of childhood pneumonia through vaccination
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:41 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: Pneumonia is the most important killer of children (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Vaccination of stray dogs against rabies is an effective strategy to reduce the risk of human rabies
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:40 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Background: Human Rabies is mainly infected through the dog bites in Sri Lanka. Mass vaccination against rabies and surgical sterilization are new strategies implemented for control of rabies in stray dogs after 2006 instead of mass culling. WHO recommends 70% vaccination coverage for eradication of rabies in dog population. Objectives were to survey stray dog population in Municipality, Dehiwala area (21km2) and to assess the effect of two consecutive mass vaccination of them against rabies. (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:40 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: Every year cervical cancer affects around 528000 women and causes 266000 deaths worldwide with 80% of deaths occurring in less developed countries with a concomitant 18-fold difference in mortality occurring between developed and developing countries. Cervical cancers is caused by the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) with the oncogenic types 16 and 18 accounting for 70% of invasive disease. Other cancers associated with HPV infection include vaginal, vulvar, penile, oropharyngeal and anal cancers. (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Development status of typhoid conjugate vaccines globally
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:40 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: Salmonella Typhi, the bacteria that causes Typhoid fever, is one of the first bacterium cultured and isolated. This scourge still affects many children and adults mainly in the poor communities in the developing countries. There are currently two moderately efficacious typhoid vaccines that are licensed in many countries and one of them has been prequalified by WHO, but there are limitations to these vaccines in terms of storage conditions, age of administration and need for revaccination because of limited efficacy. (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Safety, immune lot-to-lot consistency and non-inferiority of a fully liquid pentavalent DTwP-HepB-Hib vaccine: Results from Phase III licensure study of Shan5™
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:40 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Background: Pentavalent combination vaccines perform a key role in increasing vaccine coverage rate; and provide an efficient and reliable method of implementing WHO recommendations for controlling diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Hib infections on a worldwide basis. (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)

Hepatitis E vaccine - where are we today?
Tue, 29 Mar 2016 09:23:40 +0100 | International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract: Outbreaks and sporadic cases of hepatitis E occur globally with large epidemics occurring in resource-limited regions where there is over-crowding, unsanitary conditions and poor health services including refugee camps and internally displaced populations. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the virus infects 20 million people each year of which 3 million are acute hepatitis cases and 56,600 die. Fulminant hepatic failure is reported in those infected in the third trimester of pregnancy in some regions. (Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases)